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Texas W-E Dex Tooke 4-11-2018

Rider's Narrative Summary by Dex Tooke Record attempt : Texas W-E long Start date and exact start time to the nearest minute: April 7, 2018 20:57 CDT Exact start location described so that someone else could find the same spot: Intersection of W. Paisano Dr and Ewald Kipp Way, El Paso, Texas What were conditions like? Calm winds and heavy traffic at the start. Headwinds going up Guadalupe Mountain Climb (113 mile). Tailwind push from Carlsbad (mile 148) to West of Lamesa (308 mile), Strong, gusty headwind from East of Snyder ( mile 371) to Breckenridge (mile 492), Headwind from Breckenridge to Bowie (mile 587), Cross/headwind from Bowie to Texarkana (mile 823). Road conditions were good/bad, off/on throughout the entire ride. Texas coughed up some of the worst chipseal I've ever seen. Why did you want to do a record? I already held the Texas N-S long record and I thought it would be super cool to have my name for both N-S and W-E. What equipment did you use? Anything special? ● My primary bike was a November road bike with Shimano Di2 components, Syntace Aero Bars, Speedplay pedals, Alloy wheels and White Industry Hubs. ●My back up bicycle [...]

Texas W-E Dex Tooke 4-11-20182018-04-30T23:56:28-07:00

Andy Pruitt on Bike Fit

by John Hughes John Hughes is former director of the WUCA. He has been certified by the NSCA as a personal trainer and by USA Cycling as a coach. See coach-hughes.com. Dr. Andy Pruitt founded the Boulder Center for Sports Medicine. He is a road cyclist, mountain biker and cross-country skier. His professional appointments have included: The University of Colorado, US Olympic Training Center, Tour de Trump/Tour DuPont, Bolder Boulder and the chief medical officer of USA Cycling for the 1996 Olympic Games in Atlanta. Introduction Dr. Pruitt examines many professional and amateur cyclists. I have gone with a dozen different clients for bike fits with Dr. Pruitt. Patient Exam Pruitt begins each session by interviewing and examining the athlete: Why are you here? Are you having pain when you ride? Yes - what kind of pain? Do you suffer from knee pain? Do your knees ever click? Lock? Catch? Is it only a problem on the bike or during daily activities? What are your cycling goals? How much do you ride a year? Do you run? Hike? Do you lift weights? If so, do you lift year around or just in the winter? What exercises? Are your knees better [...]

Andy Pruitt on Bike Fit2017-02-02T17:33:09-08:00

Recovery for Long-Distance Cyclists – Part 2

Sports nutrition for optimal muscle recovery, applied to typical long-distance events by Ed Burke, Ph.D. and John Hughes John Hughes is a former director of the WUCA, an NSCA certified personal trainer and a USA Cycling coach. Learn about Hughes’ coaching at coach-hughes.com See part 1 Introduction Long-distance cyclists place great demands on their bodies, by virtue of all the miles in the saddle. And we love it! But it comes with an "ouch factor" - fatigue and muscle soreness. One of the keys to our sport is effective recovery - getting over the ouch - whether we are participating in the WUCA Mileage Challenge, taking a multi-day tour, or riding a randonnée. In part one of this article, we reviewed nutrition for optimal muscle recovery: Replenishing fluids and replacing electrolytes Replacing muscle glycogen Rebuilding muscle protein Reducing muscle and immune-system stress In part two, we discuss non-nutritional aids to recovery to: Relieve muscle soreness Promote muscle repair and growth Reduce inflammation Improve circulation Remove waste products The primary causes of muscle soreness are: Mechanical damage: When you over-load your muscles, either by significantly increasing the amount you ride or by riding much harder, the result may be microscopic tears [...]

Recovery for Long-Distance Cyclists – Part 22017-02-02T17:30:15-08:00

Recovery for Long-Distance Cyclists – Part 1

Sports nutrition for optimal muscle recovery, applied to typical long-distance events by Ed Burke, Ph.D. and John Hughes John Hughes is a former director of the WUCA, an NSCA certified personal trainer and a USA Cycling coach. Learn about Hughes’ coaching at coach-hughes.com See part 2 Introduction Long-distance cyclists love to ride all day and then get up the next morning to ride many more miles. Ultra competitors may only get a few hours sleep between long days of riding. Long-distance cyclists, because of all the miles on the bike, place more stress on their bodies than most athletes. At the same time ultra cyclists have less time to recover than riders doing shorter events. How can long-distance cyclists optimize recovery in the time available? This two-part article will cover: a) sports nutrition for optimal muscle recovery, applied to typical long-distance events, and b) non-nutritional aids for recovery, such as massage. Sports Nutrition For Optimal Muscle Recovery A) Theory Extensive research with endurance athletes shows that nutrition during rides and afterwards for recovery has four components: 1) Replenishing fluids and replacing electrolytes 2) Replacing muscle glycogen 3) Rebuilding muscle protein 4) Reducing muscle and immune-system stress. We'll start by reviewing [...]

Recovery for Long-Distance Cyclists – Part 12017-02-02T17:28:19-08:00

Eliminating the Show-stoppers

by John Hughes John Hughes is the former director of the WUCA, has been certified by the NSCA as a personal trainer and by USA Cycling as a coach. Learn about Hughes’ coaching at www.coach-hughes.com. Introduction In 1986 Pete won Race Across AMerica from Huntington Beach, CA to Atlantic City, NJ, averaging 15.40 mph for the 3,107 Miles — and Pete's RAAM average speed record remains unbroken. The next year Pete and Lon Haldeman set the men's tandem transcontinental record of 15.97 mph. I first met Pete and Lon on PAC Tour 1988 and in 2006 I had the pleasure of rooming with Pete while we were coaching at the PAC Tour Midwest camp. In one of the evening seminars Pete made the point that during the 1986 RAAM nothing hurt. Jaws dropped. Pete said that if anything had hurt, it would have distracted him from going fast. Lon agreed that during his best races nothing hurt. Pete and Lon are both analytical and excellent at devising solutions. In his first ultra races Pete had problems with hot foot, so in the 1986 RAAM he wore soft, flexible Avocet touring shoes. Lon also had problems with hot foot, so he [...]

Eliminating the Show-stoppers2017-02-02T17:25:20-08:00

Indoor Training – Part 2

The training program for indoor conditions. by Joshua "Too Tall" Simonds Joshua Simonds races tandems and is a veteran of PBP. He set a tandem course record at Calvin's Challenge this year. When not on the bike, he's a computer wank, cycling coach, massage therapist, natural cosmetic manufacturer & retailer and essential oil & sports supplement supplier living in Washington, D.C. Indoor Cycle Training:     Part 1    PART 2     Indoor Challenge Introduction Old man winter has been kind to us Easterners thus far. Mild temperatures and very little ice on the roads are reason enough to throw on the woolies and go for a delicious fixed gear ride especally on weekends when us working folks can ride during daylight hours. Unfortunately, weather, short days and time constraints all play a factor in the amount of time we can spend outdoors cycling and cross training. Because it is so accessible, relatively inexpensive and easy to use, a cycle trainer is a popular choice for indoor training. This article explores some more advanced indoor training techniques such as how to monitor and analyze workouts and how to prepare for the outdoor ultra cycling season. Last we show you some more favorite routines. [...]

Indoor Training – Part 22017-02-02T17:22:51-08:00

Indoor Training – Part 1

The training program for indoor conditions. by Joshua "Too Tall" Simonds Joshua Simonds races tandems and is a veteran of PBP. He set a tandem course record at Calvin's Challenge this year. When not on the bike, he's a computer wank, cycling coach, massage therapist, natural cosmetic manufacturer & retailer and essential oil & sports supplement supplier living in Washington, D.C. Indoor Cycle Training:     PART 1     Part 2     Indoor Challenge Introduction One sure thing lets me know that fall weather is fast approaching the Washington, D.C. area. My wife has just dropped a gentle hint for me to "take a look" at Lois Lane, her trusty second road bike that she uses mostly for indoor training. Every year with the onset of cooler weather, we look forward to a change in our outdoor cycling routines ÷ a break from long hours spent traveling to recreational rides, preparing for races and planning our busy lives. With the arrival of fall we spend less time training outdoors and switch to our winter training plans. Change is good for us and we have more time for family, friends and other off season training activities. Indoor cycle training is a discipline [...]

Indoor Training – Part 12017-02-02T17:36:33-08:00

Cold Weather Training Can Be Costly

How cold weather alters fluid and nutritional requirements during exercise. by Edmund R. Burke, Ph.D. Introduction When one studies the animal kingdom, he finds that humans may be described as warm-weather, tropical animals who neither adapt or tolerate cold weather. As we know, however, humans still must work and exercise in such environments. In order to cycle effectively outdoors in the winter and early spring, you need to know how cold affects you and whether it alters your fluid and nutritional requirements during exercise. While cycling, your body is generating 8 to 12 times the heat it would while at rest, which is more than enough to maintain your body temperature in the cold. Under most circumstances when you are dressed properly cold weather has little or no effect on your body temperature because your energy production overrides the cold temperatures and wind chill. Some cyclists who exercise in the cold have higher caloric needs. Scientists have found that this is primarily due to the various cycling conditions encountered and amount and type of clothing and shoes worn. For example, riding a heavier bicycle and the added rolling resistance of riding on trails or in the snow and heavier shoes [...]

Cold Weather Training Can Be Costly2017-02-02T17:38:01-08:00

Glycemic Index

by Jenny Hegmann Jenny Hegmann, MS, RD, is co-author of The Cyclist's Food Guide: Fueling for Distance ((c) 2005 Sports Nutrition Publishers) with Nancy Clark, MS, RD. Hegmann is a sports nutritionist and long-distance cyclist. She lives and works in the greater Boston area. Glycemic Index* and Glycemic Load All foods are from the US or Canada unless otherwise specified. Glycemic index is based on a 50-gram carbohydrate portion. Glycemic load is based on selected portion sizes (indicated in the last column). Low GI <40 Moderate GI 40 - 70 High GI >70 Low GI (<40) Food Glycemic Index Glycemic Load Serving size (grams) fructose 12 1 15 (1 tbsp) lentils 28 5 100 (1/2 cup) wheat tortilla (Mexican) 30 8 50 (8-inch) apricots, dried 31 6 30 (10 halves) milk, skim 32 4 250 (8 oz) spaghetti, whole-wheat 32 11 140 (1 cup) yogurt, low-fat, fruit (Australia) 33 13 240 (8 oz) milk, chocolate low-fat 34 9 250 (8 oz) tomato juice 33 4 250 (8 oz) Ironman PR bar, choc. 39 7 45 (1 bar) Moderate GI (40 - 70) Food Glycemic Index Glycemic Load Serving size (grams) apple, raw 40 7 140 (3-inch) spaghetti, white 47 20 [...]

Glycemic Index2017-02-02T17:38:45-08:00
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